Lee Shih-Yang

Winter Program Taiwan

Check out all the activities for the coming months.

scroll down for full details in English and Chinese.

 

Live Talk about Latency Project

Saturday October 23, Lin’s Culture Taipei

 

First presentation of new group YiWoYu (invitation only)

October 30, Beitou

 

Concerts with Lee Shih-Yang and Arnaud Lechat

November 13, December 15 Taipei

 

Workshop:  Shruti Days

November 20 + 21, Taipei

 

Shruti Box market

Tuesday November 23, Taipei

 

Sounding Out! concert

November 27, Taipei

 

Concert with Hans de Back in Taichung

Monday December 6, 2:30-4:15, Taichung: Social Innovation Unit

 

Concert: Latency with Oorbeek and Kao Dao Yin

19 december, Wen Shui, Taipei
https://ariealt.home.xs4all.nl/oorbeek/

 

Postponed: Dulan Voice Yoga Retreat

Due to pandemic. Stay tuned for updates.

 

 

 

THE DETAILS PER EVENT

 

Live Talk about Latency Project

Saturday October 23, Lin’s Culture Taipei

Presenting the concert with Oorbeek and Ka Dao Yin on December 19.

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/569629994461599/?

 

 

First presentation of new group YiWoYu (invitation only)

This year saw the founding of a new group around the workshop I have led throughout the years. The first concerts were cancelled due to the pandemic, so on October 3o we will hold a small informal presentation in Beitou of the things we have been working on this year.

 

 

 

 

Concerts with Lee Shih-Yang and Arnaud Lechat

Two concerts with a jazz trio with Taiwanese pianist Lee Shih-Yang, sax/clarinet player Arnaud Lechat 貓阿諾 and Dutch vocalist Mark Van Tongeren.

音樂微旅行
2021-11-13(六) 19:30 ~ 21:30

鳴石音樂空間 (台灣台北市仁愛路二段34號5F)
https://www.accupass.com/event/2109010821348705579300

 

 

 

 

Workshop:  Singing and Shruti Days

For those who are busy during the week and prefer weekends, there is a short, two-day workshop

November 20 + 21, Taipei

FB event version: https://www.facebook.com/events/908540519769127/?

Register form: https://forms.gle/XRWgFs8xzf1GP4fP8
༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝
(See English version at the bottom.)
༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝
睽違一年的「印度風琴之日」回來了!
經歷了疫情的衝擊,有諸多活動被迫停擺,終於在年末,我們可以舉辦這個兩日工作坊。歡迎需要實體課釋放聲音的創作力的學員、想要繼續進步自己的即興技巧的學員,一同來參與,一起更上層樓。
適合想要用聲音與旋律表達、與別人深度交流的歌者。
無論你是初心者或是資深歌唱家,都能在這個有機的現場,挖掘到新的事物!
☀去年學長姐的體驗:
「再次享受在音樂的喜悅與自由當中,擁有『發聲』的開心」
「謝謝老師,我不只學會了印度風琴,更學會享受我的聲音。」
「謝謝老師帶我感受印度風琴的美好,與無限的可能。」
꧁ 2021 吟唱與印度風琴工作坊 ꧂ —- 人聲 / 旋律 / 持續長音 —-
探索你的聲音,與印度風琴的陪伴,學習一系列的技巧。
兩天工作坊,
一個傍晚、一個白天,
學習即興旋律的奧義、探索人聲質地,
在印度風琴支持下探索織體架構。
時間:
2021年 11月20日(六)、21日(日)
第一天 ༝ 14:00-21:00
第二天 ༝ 09:30-16:30
(中間皆有含一小時吃飯休息)
地點:
台北  表演36房 4F音樂能量房
文山區木新路二段156之1號
費用與詳細資訊
https://forms.gle/XRWgFs8xzf1GP4fP8
早鳥優惠只到10/31(日),趕快瞭解!
聯絡:
中文 Clémentine
line: meimanghuang
email: starysky1017@gmail.com
English Mark
mark@fusica.nl / Facebook / Phone 09 103 827 49
༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝
2021
SHRUTI & SINGING DAYS
Vocals, melodies and drones
༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝༝
Learn to free your voice using a simple drone instrument. The main aim of these two days is to learn to improvise melodies, explore vocal timbres and voice textures with a shruti box. For example: how to invent new motifs and phrases on the spot? How to use different scales (even if you cannot read notes)? How can you combine the voice and shruti box drones? With many demo’s, exercises and your own explorations we will hear and see that vocal improvisations with a drone make you a better musician and more skilled sound explorer.
You will go home with plenty of new ideas and experiences to start or enrich an enjoyable, adventurous singing practise.
* What the shruti box can do for you
* How to use the Shruti box
* How to start exploring your voice, using a drone instrument?
* Working with diffferent timbres and vowels
* What is this kind of singing good for?
* Why reading notes is not necessary to become a good singer
* How to start and develop improvising melodies with a drone?
* Following intuitions. Developing skills
* Seeing through common illusions about music
* Invent new motifs and phrases on the spot
* Where to start when you think you cannot sing?
* How to tap into embodied knowledge that you never use?
* How to become a good listener?
* Develop improvisations together
* Understanding and using basic scales and intervals
Watch a video of Mark playing shruti box here:
https://youtu.be/BhiMamcPuMw?t=1519
FOR WHOM:
– people who feel a lack of creative output
– people looking for a deeper connection with themselves and others
WHAT YOU NEED
Your own shruti box, or you can borrow one.
DATES TIMES
Saturday November 20, 14:00-21:00
Sunday November 21, 9:30-16:30
PLACE
4F Music Energy Room,
Performing Art School 36,
Taipei City.
For more details, please contact
In English: Mark
mark@fusica.nl / Facebook / Phone 09 103 827 49
In Chinese: Clémentine
starysky1017@gmail.com
Line: meimanghuang

 

 

 

 

SHRUTI BOX MARKET

After a long wait because of Covid 19, our supplier in India finally sent a new batch of shruti boxes, which has just arrived.

Tuesday November 23, at Canjune, Taipei, 4-6 PM.

We have various shruti boxes tuned on multiple pitches andin  two different sizes. Come and check it out.

The shruti box can be used for all kinds of purposes: playing for yourself or with others, learning more about musical structure and harmony, or free play.

The types we mostly have are the first one, the high quality Paloma – others are mostly sold out now.

 

 

 

 

 

Sounding Out!  發聲音樂會

November 27, 14:30-16:30, NEIHU, Taipei

 

A long-cherished plan of mine is becoming reality soon: an event where pro’s and amateurs can share the stage, where inspiration runs freely, where singing meets dancing, where movement meets instruments, where laughter and cries meet silence.

Catching the spirit of the moment, a phrase already in use at my first concert in Taiwan in 2003, remains the best description, but the format is now more refined, more inclusive, and more exciting than ever before. This is not a workshop but a performance that you can enjoy from beginning to end. And yet it is not a normal performance since you can join in at various stages, but only if the spirit of the moment catches you. No obligation to join, but my teammates and I cannot guarantee you keep on sitting still with your mouth shut once you are there.

Come and try this out, we have arranged for a fantastic large space that invites anyone’s inspiration to run free. To turn this into a success we need plenty of creative individuals joining (which has mostly been taken care off) as well as plenty of audience for foot-tapping, humming, applause and sharing that magic silence after an apotheosis.

November 27, 14:30-16:30, doors open 14:00.

Various ticket prices from 420 to 700 NT$

Location:  Hao Hao Shuo Hua, Neihu.

For the full details please go to

https://www.tikipoki.com.tw/…/sounding-out-%e7%99%bc…/

 

 

 

GET YOUR TICKETS and SEE ALL INFO ON TIKIPOKI

Click here

▮▯▮▯▮
我們的聲音,有什麼樣的界限?
身體要怎麼跟上自由的界域呢?
▮▯▮▯▮
「分享」本身是一種美,我們用即興去接觸:
聲音的共有與交換
承接與轉換
層層疊疊
時間空間與能量開展
是如何在當下存有而完滿?
▮▯▮▯▮
在這個疫情,人與人之間的區隔
能不能用音樂與流動的即興,再重新建立呢?
2021年 11月 27日 (六)
■□□□□□□□ S o u n d i n g – o u t !
《發聲音樂會》 ■■■■■■■□
14:30-16:30
ℙ𝕝𝕒𝕔𝕖:好好說話工作坊
地址:台北市明水路575號B1
本次音樂會將會邀請觀眾一同沈浸在即興的世界中,
Mark Van Tongeren長期在心裡醞釀的計畫。
這會是不同與以往的音樂會,不是由馬克一位音樂家獨立完成,也不是樂團的即興演出。
而是與來賓一起豐盛地完成演出!
人人都有歌可以唱、人人都是歌唱家!
馬克與神秘嘉賓將會協助來賓,帶領參與者一起讓午後的樂章成形!在這個未知的時光之中,唯一可以確定的是,有你的參與才能讓旅程展開!
邀請您與我們一起共襄盛舉!
11/4 12:00 早鳥啟售
請上「口袋售票」搜尋:Sounding out!發聲音樂會,加入會員即可購票!
https://www.tikipoki.com.tw/…/sounding-out-%e7%99%bc…/
用line加好友也可以購票喔!
https://youtu.be/yK9P_w0VW-M

 

 

Concert with Hans de Back in Taichung

Date: Dec. 6th (mon)
Performance time: 2:30~3:45pm
+ QA and sharing: 3:45~4:15pm (0.5hr)
PLACE:
Taichung Social Innovation Unit
      7F., No. 291-3, Jingwu Rd. North Dist., Taichung City, Taiwan

More information and reservations: Una Kao:

0953157815‬

unakao@yahoo.com.tw

 

 

Concert #2 with Lee Shih-Yang  and Arnaud Lechat

歌謠之外 More Than Songs
2021/12/15(三)19:30

臺大藝文中心雅頌坊 (臺北市羅斯福路四段一號)

https://arts.ntu.edu.tw/Event.aspx?PID=03a80c27-fc26-462f-9355-86cbb89c747e&ID=e8a9c018-22cf-4bae-a2c5-a388b6fd6de1#.YVXRH5pBzIU

 

Concert: Latency with Oorbeek and Kao Dao Yin

19 december, 8 PM, Wen Shui, Taipei

Details t.b.c.

 

 

Postponed: Dulan Voice Yoga  Retreat

Possible new date: mid January.

 

 

 

 

 

Bodies Performing Sound

I see improvisation as much more than a musical technique. While watching the performance of Joëlle Landrée, solo and with Lee Shih-Yang (November 4, Nankang Theatre, Taipei), half of my attention goes to the mimicry, body language and theatrical techniques of Landrée, who is ‘acting with’ her double bass as much as she is playing it. She talks through it, of course, but also to it. She treats it sometimes as a human being, or perhaps an animal, as she feigns anger or joy towards it. At one moment she gently kicked the lower part of her bass with her foot, as if kicking a dog bothering her.

INTERCONNECTED CIRCUITS

Joëlle Léandre responds visibly to her own music: almost as if it is not her making that music, but player and played are two; and she responds visibily to Lee Shih-Yang’s music and stage persona. In this way she sets up some sort of loops or interconnected circuits with the following elements:

  • a body performing, producing sound
  • a body responding to its own sound
  • a body playing with and for another performer in/through sound and in/through bodily gestures, facial expressions
  • a body listening and responding to that other performer in/through sound and in/through bodily gestures, facial expressions
  • and also, a body playing music and acting out the music for an audience
  • and responding to the audience (although rarely, in this case).

 

The music is the central theme of all these actions, it pervades it, surrounds it, generates it, steers it. But looking at the music alone would greatly limit our understanding of what is going on.

Joëlle Léandre’s performance was full of humor in more ways than music only can convey. Music in itself can certainly convey humor (I think of Dutch conceptual artist Wim T. Schippers playing a well-known Bach piece on piano, making all sorts of mistakes, trying to correct himself, repeating phrases, moving faster and slower, in the music-theatre piece Hoogwater voorheen Laagwater, 2016). But sometimes the musician herself becomes not just the medium of the music or sound, but something more like an actor or performer, aware of the fact that she is also playing a role onstage. She might exaggerate musical gestures in more than simply practical ways, she might use the body and facial expressions to convey messages that go far beyond what musicians express ‘as music’.

 

Léandre’s face showed some sort of running commentary to her own music and to the interaction with Lee Shih-Yang and at times made the audience laugh. By doing that, she puts the musician’s efforts between brackets, distances herself from it, provides some sort of criticism even as she is making music. It enhances the important idea in improvisation that the music itself, too, can be a running commentary on what the performers do.

 

You could say that some (in fact: many) musicians provide this commentary more discreetly, by only responding in music and not or not clearly in gesture, face, or body. Léandre on the other hand chose to enlarge her response through these means, making it less discrete, less hidden, less vague to the audience. Yet there were also moments when her playing, and her playing only, was a comment: this is one of the most common patterns in improvisation, and certainly so in jazz, where the musicians ‘comment’ on each other, ‘talk’ to each other. They build and exchange phrases, affirm and challenge each other, take the point of one musician further by moving on with it. This too was happening Saturday in Nankang theatre: rhythms, melodic patterns, noises and clusters going back and forth between Léandre and Lee, without obvious physical expression going along with it.

 

Intense music that requires concentrated listening, and where we can hardly be sure that what I hear is what the musicians intend, but where we still try to figure out what Lee is doing with Léandre’s ideas, and vice versa (of course, a perfectly valid alternative is not to care about this at all, but ‘simply enjoy’ the music, without figuring things out that you cannot know for sure anyway).

 

Music itself naturally triggers all sorts of physical, facial and other expressions, fitting to the roles of dedicated, serious musicians. We see it all the time, in video clips, classical performances, jazz: any music style has a number of ways in which the musician seeks ways to express music’s manifold qualities. Just some musicians, more than others, go way beyond the musical language itself. One can debate if this contributes to the music or distracts from it: purists might be bothered and uninterested in musicians acting out their performance too much. There are plenty of examples of exaggerated and silly theatricality in musical performance. One that comes to mind is many modern, female pipa players (a Chinese type of lute held upright in front of the player), who excessively sway their bodies and heads. I mostly prefer the old pipa practice where the music does not need all that visual display; it usually sounds better. Certain kinds of theatricality add nothing to the music but commercial value; it sometimes only serves to cover up a lack of genuine musical quality.

 

If the music still comes first, though, the expansion of the performative language can add many layers of meaning and expression to an already rich, interesting performance, instead of peeling off those layers. In rare cases, performers truly and convincingly embody multiple languages, fluently blending the musical performance mode with other ones, like dance, movement, facial expressions. In India, earlier this year, I had a chance to see a live performance if singer Venkatesh Kumar. He is an absolute master of of his raga improvisations and also of his body. In several long drawn-out pieces he used his arms, hands and facial expressions to express his journey through the dense network of musical connections that makes up a raga. Fascinating stuff!

 

So far for the non-musical gestures. I guess some of this can be gleaned also from a brand new book that I hope to read soon. It will certainly interest those who want to know more about the why’s and how’s of improvising: Marcel Cobussen’s The Field of Musical Improvisation, an e-book that is free for download since a few weeks.

 

Last night was the first concert with Makigami Koichi. Tonight is the closing concert of the TIIMF here in Taipei.

 

Saturday November 25

Zhongshan Hall, Taipei, 19:30

Closing concert of the Taiwan International Improvised Music Festival

With Porta Chiusa; and Makigami Koichi (voice, theremin, Jew’s harp, shakuhachi), Tung Chaoming (guzheng), Mark van Tongeren (voice, sruti box, Jew’s harp), and others

 

Sunday November 26

Reykjavik Lab /愛雷克雅維克實驗室, Taipei

13:30-17:00, workshop Improvise!

Details and tickets on Accupass, or send a message to 0910382749

Jaap Blonk at TIIF in Taiwan

Last night fellow Dutchman Jaap Blonk arrived in Taiwan for a couple of gigs and a workshop, as part of the first Taiwan International Improvised Music Festival. I have the honour to host him the first few days. Several local improvisers and I will share the stage with him, today in Hsinchu and Thursday in Taipei.

Holland'sBankroetDoorDada

Jaap is a composer and vocal artist, best known for his interpretation of Kurt Schwitter’s Ursonate, one of the founding – and lasting – classics of the Dada movement which shook the art world between 1916 and 1924. I first met Jaap in 1995, when we shared the stage at the presentation of a book about Dada in The Netherlands, Holland’s Bankroet door Dada.

Last night we discussed, among many other things, the merits of being born as a Dutch-speaker. To start with, this makes it easy to understand and correctly pronounce German texts, and texts derived from the sounds of German speech, like the Ursonate. Someone from, say, an English speaking country, would have much more trouble getting the pronunciation of all the vowels and diphtongs (two vowels combined) right, not to mention the consonants (the guttural ones are particularly notorious for foreign speakers). And growing up in a small country like The Netherlands, it is almost natural for us to learn to speak the languages of the surrounding countries, so that many Dutch speak (and know the particularities of the sounds of) German, English and French. In addition, Jaap noted, we have all the varieties of the ‘r’ sound (we have a guttural r, a softer and a harder ‘velar’ r, and an r with a flapping tongue). Jaap has incorporated many of these speech elements in his sound poetry, which is sometimes based on actual spoken language, sometimes on his own imaginary language, and also on abstract procedures based on or derived from speech, extending, finally, into various musical/sonic dimensions such as breath, shrieks, groans, etcetera. Besides composing and performing with these elements and developing a sizable body of original works, Jaap’s stage presence and inimitable mimicry has brought him world fame. His current tour in Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, The Phillipines and Taiwan is the second one in Asia, after another tour he did in Japan last Summer.

ursonate_2003

He told me he had performed in Shanghai years ago at a poetry festival, where he was asked by the organisers to do something with a Chinese text. He studied the text with someone speaking Chinese, to get the sounds right. But then, when turning it into sound poetry and given the difficulties of the Chinese tone system for a speaker not used to a tonal language, the poem’s meaning came out completely different, possibly, Jaap explained, including many strange messages he was not aware of.

Besides, it is a different thing to deconstruct the elements of speech for a Westerner, whose understanding of speech sound is based on more or less phonetic writing, and for a Mandarin speaker, whose understanding of speech sound is based on Chinese character forming complete syllables – in fact, complete words. To create sound poetry à la Schwitters poses even bigger challenges for from Mandarin speakers than English speakers.

 

December 1, 19:30, concert of Jaap Blonk, with guest appearances of Lee Shih-Yang and Mark van Tongeren, National Chiao Tung University (Hsinchu),

December 2, 19:30-21:30. lecture/workshop with Jaap Blonk, Nanhai Gallery, No.3, Lane 19, Sec. 2, Chongcing S. Rd., Zhongzheng District, Taipei

December 3, 19:30-21:30, concert Jaap Blonk with Tung Chaoming, Lee Shih-Yang, Lin Hsiaofeng, Lin Huikuan, Liu Fangyi, Chang Yousheng, Terry, Mark van Tongeren. Nanhai Theater, No.47, Nanhai Rd., Zhongzheng Distict, Taipei

Tickets for the festival are here.

More information about the full program of the Taiwan International Improvised Music Festival is here.

TIIMF2015line-up

 

Sainkho Namtchylak returns to Taipei

sainkho- DOM Moscow 2005-
Tuvan folksong / extended vocal techniques / throat singing-diva Sainkho performs once again in Taiwan. Sainkho was born in Soviet-era Tuva, in a Siberian outpost within eyesight of Mongolia. She developed more than average singing skills and during the late 1980s she took advantage of the political/cultural reformations (perestroika) to set out on an innovative career that soon put her in the international ranks of outstanding, progressive singers.

She moved to Austria in 1994, and was begged to come back to Tuva by president Sholban Kara-ool this month, while she visited Tuva.

She established her name with sweat and original interpretations of Tuvan songs in the early 1990s and experimental work. Nowadays much of Sainkho’s output is ecclectic, avant-garde, with an electrifying, ear-catching aura to it. She is an amazingly busy and energetic performer, who constantly travels the world to collaborate with ever new musicians, pouring out CD after CD, and re-inventing herself every year.

Exactly ten years ago, she gave a memorable concert in Zhongshan Hall, and a throat singing workshop in TNUA (reported in Chung Mingder’s book OM. Overtone singing as meditation). At that time she brought with her German Popov, an old friend of mine from Amsterdam (born in the Ukraine), and singer/guitarist Caspar David Sacker from Austria. I am happy to see that this time she works with a local musician (and again a friend of mine), the Taipei-based pianist Lee Shih-Yang. Also taking part will be Dickson Dee, a Hong Kong sound artist.

This concert is highly recommended for all people interested in Tuvan/Mongolian music, throat singing and new vocal techniques. When I spread this message through my Fusica newsletter there were still tickets left. Now there aren’t…  But I had reserved a bunch of tickets for the students of my R E S O N A N C E  course through Lee Shih-Yang. If you are interested respond quick (reply below) and I can see if he still has a ticket for the October 5 show for you . Tickets are 500 NT$ minus a little discount. Hope to see you there!

2014新點子樂展Innovation Series – 人聲風景「即興篇」
SoundScape-Improvisation Across the Horizon

Videolink Youku
Taipei,

Experimental Theatre

October 4 19:00

October 5, 14:30